Manayunk Congregation

4101 Freeland Ave, Philadelphia, PA

Center City Congregation

1336 Spring Garden St, Philadelphia, PA

Exiles - Pursuing Future Hope

Now what? That’s the question burning in Jesus’ disciples mind at the beginning of the Book of Acts. Jesus lived, died and rose to forgive their sin and promise them eternal life. But now what? Jesus answers this question with three simple words: Be my witnesses! The Christian life is an exhilarating adventure of bearing witness of what we have seen, felt and experienced through the gospel of Jesus. The Book of Acts displays the Kingdom of God, in all its wonder, advancing by the power of the Holy Spirit through the planting of churches. All this activity stems from who Jesus has made us: His witnesses!

Manayunk Sermons

How do we respond when inevitable future suffering become our present reality? Peter reminds us of three way we can trust God in the midst of our trials.

Resources:

1 Peter 4:12-19

NAC, 1 Peter, Tom Schreiner

Depression: Looking up from the Stubborn Darkness by Ed Welch

 

If we're honest, we all know some degree of difficulty is coming for us in the future. In this passage, we see three keys for preparing for our future: knowing who we live for, looking further down the line, and looking outward.

Resources:

1 Peter 4:1-11

Walking with God Through Pain and Suffering, Timothy Keller

1 Peter, Baker Exegetical Commentary, Karen Jobes

1 Peter, New American Commentary, Tom Schreiner

A living hope in Jesus compels us to live so that others glorify God. One of the ways we can do this is by blessing those who bother us.

Resources:

1 Peter 3:8-22

New American Commentary, 1 Peter, by Tom Schreiner

Baker Exegetical Commentary, 1 Peter, by Karen Jobes

 

As followers of Jesus, the goal of our lives is to live so other see our good deeds and glorify God. In 1 Peter 3:1-7, Peter addresses how that goal transforms the pattern of our marriages.

Resources:

1 Peter 3:1-7

New American Commentary, 1 Peter, by Tom Schreiner

Marriage on the Edge of Eternity by Francis Chan (article)

As people who have been brought into relationship with God, Christians have a new purpose. We live so others will see our good deeds and glorify God by believing in Jesus.

Resources:

1 Peter 2:11-25

1 Peter, New American Commentary, Tom Schreiner

1 Peter, Baker Exegetical Commentary, Karen Jobes

Through the gospel, you've been given a sure, joyous inheritance. Therefore, hope, live and love like you have an inheritance.

Resources:

1 Peter 1:13-2:3

1 Peter, Baker Exegetical Commentary by Karen Jobes

1 Peter, New American Commentary by Tom Schreiner

Peter writes his letter to encourage people who are no longer home where they are because they worship Jesus. In 1 Peter 1:1-12 he offers them the greatest possible hope: Though you're not home, you can worship God now.

Resources:

1 Peter 1:1-12

1 Peter: Baker Exegetical Commentary by Karen Jobes

1 Peter: New American Commentary by Tom Schreiner

1 Peter: Tyndale New Testament Commentary by Wayne Grudem

Center City Sermons

When suffering brings us low, we wonder how we can be made high. Pride says I need it now and only I can be trusted to make it happen. In this passage, Peter calls us to a humble approach to God and others that leads to true exaltation from God.

Resources:

1 Peter 5

Biblical Eldership, Alexander Strauch

The Freedom of Self Forgetfulness, Timothy Keller

1 Peter, Baker Exegetical Commentary, Karen Jobes

1 Peter, New American Commentary, Tom Schreiner

We can plan for suffering, but what happens when it actually comes? In this passage, God calls us to respond to suffering by trusting Him and doing good when we suffer. We can do this because his glory is coming, his glory is present now, and his judgment is present with it.

Resources:

1 Peter 4:12-19

Walking with God Through Pain and Suffering, Timothy Keller

1 Peter, Baker Exegetical Commentary, Karen Jobes

1 Peter, New American Commentary, Tom Schreiner

If we're honest, we all know some degree of difficulty is coming for us in the future. In this passage, we see three keys for preparing for our future: knowing who we live for, looking further down the line, and looking outward.

Resources:

1 Peter 4:1-11

Walking with God Through Pain and Suffering, Timothy Keller

1 Peter, Baker Exegetical Commentary, Karen Jobes

1 Peter, New American Commentary, Tom Schreiner

Eternal hope radically reshapes the purpose of our lives. We live so others glorify God. One of the primary ways we do this is by blessing those who bother us.

Resources:

1 Peter 3:8-22

New American Commentary, 1 Peter, by Tom Schreiner

Baker Exegetical Commentary, 1 Peter, by Karen Jobes

Just as our purpose in general is to live so others would glorify God, our purpose in marriage is to live so our spouse glorifies God. Husbands and wives do this by showing Jesus to one another, but each in their own unique way.

Resources:

1 Peter 3:1-7

The Meaning of Marriage, Tim and Kathy Keller

The Council of Biblical Manhood and Womanhood

1 Peter, Baker Exegetical Commentary, Karen Jobes

1 Peter, New American Commentary, Tom Schreiner

 

Though we are in exile now, God has promised all Christians an eternal home with him in the future. How are we to live in the meantime, especially among those who don’t believe? Our purpose is to live in such a way that they will glorify God because of our conduct.

Resources:

1 Peter 2:11-25

1 Peter, Baker Exegetical Commentary, Karen Jobes

1 Peter, New American Commentary, Tom Schreiner

The End of Memory: Remembering Rightly in a Violent World, Miroslav Volf

Christians are priests with special access to God through Christ for the purpose of declaring God's praise

Resources:

1 Peter 2:4-10

1 Peter, Baker Exegetical Commentary, Karen Jobes

1 Peter, New American Commentary, Tom Schreiner

Through the gospel, you've been given a sure, joyous inheritance. Therefore, hope, live and love like you have an inheritance.

Resources:

1 Peter 1:13-2:3

1 Peter, Baker Exegetical Commentary by Karen Jobes

1 Peter, New American Commentary by Tom Schreiner

To be an exile means that you are not home, and all of us experience this sense that the world isn’t the way it’s supposed to be. Yet in the midst of that we can worship God because he’s given us an inheritance that is secure, brings joy, and is highly valuable.

Resources:

1 Peter 1:1-12

1 Peter: Baker Exegetical Commentary by Karen Jobes

1 Peter: New American Commentary by Tom Schreiner

1 Peter: Tyndale New Testament Commentary by Wayne Grudem